CHINED Board and aims

The CHINED Board consists of:

  • Nicholas Brownlees (University of Florence)
  • Birte Bös (University of Duisburg-Essen)
  • Udo Fries (University of Zurich)
  • Nicholas Brownlees is Professor of English Language at the University of Florence. He has written extensively on early modern news and is co-compiler of the FEEN (Florence Early English Newspapers) corpus. He is the author of The Language of Periodical News in Seventeenth Century England (2014, 2nd edition) and co-author of News as Changing Texts: Corpora, Methodologies and Analysis (2015, 2nd edition). He is also editor of  News Discourse in Early Modern Britain (2006) and The Language of Public and Private Communication in a Historical Perspective (2010).
    Birte Bös is Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Duisburg Essen, Germany. Her research interests include synchronic and diachronic pragmatics, discourse analysis and media linguistics. She has investigated the communicative practices of historical and modern news discourse, and is the co-editor of Changing Genre Conventions in Historical English News Discourse (2015). She is coauthor of News as Changing Texts: Corpora, Methodologies and Analysis (2015, 2nd edition).
    Udo Fries was Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, until his retirement in 2007. He has published widely in the fields of English philology, syntax and text linguistics. In recent years he has concentrated on work in computer corpus linguistics, producing ZEN (The Zurich English Newspaper Corpus), a corpus of 17th- and 18th-century English newspapers. He is coauthor of News as Changing Texts: Corpora, Methodologies and Analysis (2015, 2nd edition).

    Aims of CHINED Board

    The aim of the CHINED Board is to promote the communication and discussion of research into the discourse of historical news texts written in the English language. In this primary objective the focus is on linguistic analysis of specific text genres traditionally associated with the domain of news, such as ballads, pamphlets, newspapers, magazines, correspondence, histories, annals, etc.
    However, as a secondary objective, we are also interested in the possibility of opening up the scholarly debate on historical news to incorporate news texts from other languages. As with English news texts, the study of such texts should focus on news discourse strategies relating, for example, to the fields of media discourse, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, stylistics and other related linguistic models. We are strong believers in the value and significance of interdisciplinary studies — hence our interest in involving news historians in our research—but believe that CHINED should primarily focus on the language of news.